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Text and photos by SCOTT FYBUSH

If you’ve been with us for the last few weeks of Site of the Week installments featuring our Nashville trip from last September, you’re probably wondering two things: “did we sleep at all?” (not much), and “where the heck is WSM?”

Opryland's main entrance
Opryland’s main entrance

WSM from outside
WSM from outside

Nashville’s legendary 50,000-watt radio station may not be a huge force in ratings or revenue anymore, but WSM remains a Music City institution, and of course we weren’t about to leave town without paying our respects to the legend.

Wall of history
Wall of history

Production room
Production room

We’d never been inside the WSM studio, which had been through some big adventures in the last few years. A massive flood in 2010 that devastated the Nashville area wreaked particular havoc on the low-lying piece of land where the Opryland Hotel sits northeast of town. As the water rose into WSM’s showcase studio near Opryland’s main entrance and hotel guests were evacuated, engineers and programmers loaded music and equipment on a bell cart and drove away to set up a temporary studio at the station’s transmitter site 15 miles south in Brentwood.

Rack room
Rack room

WSM's sofa
WSM’s sofa

It took more than six months before things were dried out and WSM was ready to come home to Opryland, which it did in late 2010 – and it’s that rebuilt studio that we had the pleasure of visiting on our last day in town.

As a broadcast ambassador of sorts for Gaylord, the resort/entertainment company that owns the station, WSM has a prominent place at the Opryland complex, its main air studio visible behind windows right near the main entrance, right next to an elaborate wall display of the station’s more than nine decades of history.

WSM air board
WSM air board

On the air at WSM
On the air at WSM

The entrance to the studio complex is hidden inconspicuously around a corner, built into what had once been an ordinary Opryland hotel room, now converted into a rack room and vestibule for an adjacent production room.

From there, a door leads into the main studio complex, which consists of a talent area set down a few steps from the control console at the back of the room. This showcase studio was just wrapping up Bill Cody’s morning show when we stopped by; that’s Cody’s morning sidekick Charlie Mattos at the board across from Bill.

WSM office building
WSM office building

Production room
Production room

Before WSM moved its studio into Opryland itself in the 1990s, it spent a little more than a decade operating from a low-slung building adjacent to the Opryland entry road alongside McGavock Pike. When WSM came here in 1983 from its previous location on Knob Road (shared with WSM-TV, now WSMV, as we saw in the first installment of our Nashville series), this was already a building with plenty of its own radio history.

For many decades, this site on McGavock Pike was the transmitter home of one of WSM’s competitors, WSIX (980), which used this building from 1942 until it moved out in 1974 to make room for the Opryland development. (WSIX moved to a new site on Neelys Bend Road and eventually became present-day WYFN, part of the Bible Broadcasting Network.)

Even after the WSM studios opened inside Opryland, the station’s offices remained in this building at 2644 McGavock Pike, which were renovated (not “demolished,” as Wikipedia erroneously states) after suffering flood damage in 2010. There are still production studios in this building, too, using the former WSM and WSM-FM air studios.

WSM transmitter building
WSM transmitter building

WSM front hall
WSM front hall

And that brings us to our final stop on our Nashville trip, because how can you not finish off with the big one? WSM’s 800-foot tower is a landmark along I-65 south of Nashville, just as it was a landmark for the trains that used to pass by this site in Brentwood back in the day.

History on display
History on display

Engineer's office
Engineer’s office

Inside, this building sparkles, from the “WSM” shield (from National Life’s “We Shield Millions” slogan, of course) inlaid in the front hall to the historic displays that fill the front hall and the old engineering office to the right. There’s still a functioning kitchen off to the left, too – but we head straight back to the transmitter room, where a DX50 and 3DX50 face off across the big transmitter hall.

More history on display
More history on display

Transmitter room
Transmitter room

There’s more history on display all over this room, including old tower beacons and tunin coils on one side and consoles on the other – and in the middle, the desk that served as the WSM air studio for much of 2010 while the Opryland studio was being rebuilt!

Transmitter room
Transmitter room

Machine shop
Machine shop

Downstairs, it’s just as pristine, including a vintage boiler room, a fallout shelter from the Cold War era and a fully-functional machine shop.

The tower
The tower

Doghouse
Doghouse

Looking up
Looking up

And out back, we get the closest look we’ve ever had at the mighty Blaw-Knox beast, from the tuning house right out to the very base of this majestic tower, which turns 85 this year.

Tuning house
Tuning house

Feedline
Feedline

Tower base
Tower base

From here, it’s a drive through Nashville afternoon traffic back to the airport and back home, but with wonderful memories of a splendid week in the Music City and a promise to be back soon to see (and eat!) even more.

Thanks to Jason Cooper for the tour!

APRIL SHOWERS BRING…DISCOUNTS!

If you’re still don’t have your Tower Site Calendar, we’ve lowered the price even more!

Go to our store, click on the “Broadcasting Calendars” tab, select the options for the Tower Site Calendar (be sure to click on “yes” or “no” for a storage bag) and add it to your cart. Click on the “View Cart” button, and you are ready to check out.

And don’t forget our hand-numbered autographed calendar. It’s also on sale, but this is a limited edition.

2017-calendar-coverJohn Schneider’s “Radio Historian’s Calendar” has been so popular this year we’ve had trouble keeping it in stock, but we’re still selling it, and it’s price is lower, too. This year’s calendar features buildings that once housed radio.

And don’t miss a big batch of Nashville IDs next Wednesday, over at our sister site, TopHour.com!

Next week: Durham Region, Ontario